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KAA'BOC (2015)

Kaa'boc, in the Amazonian Tupi language, means « what comes from the forest ». The term caboclo originates from this word and means, in Brazil, the Métis people whose ancestors were Native Americans and Europeans. These cultures met at the beginning of the XXth century, when Brazilian people who originated from Europe decided to settle in the Amazonian forest in order to exploit its natural rubber resources. Today, Caboclos people still live in small communities along the Amazon river and its tributaries.
The Kaa'boc photo project presents Damaceno and Regina's family, who live in isolation on the banks of the Tapajo river, living from the resources coming from the river and the forest. They mainly grow cassava when the market prices are interesting enough, but they also live from fishing and hunting, which they do everyday to support themselves.
In this project, and through Damaceno's family, I seek to show the way of life of a whole region.